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Fetal brain lesions after subcutaneous inoculation of Zika virus in a pregnant nonhuman primate

Fetal brain lesions after subcutaneous inoculation of Zika virus in a pregnant nonhuman primate
Author: 
Kristina M. Adams Waldorf, M.D.
Published: 
Sep 2016
Publisher: 
Nat Med. 2016 Sep 12. doi: 10.1038/nm.4193.

Adams Waldorf KM1, Stencel-Baerenwald JE2,3, Kapur RP4,5, Studholme C6,7,8, Boldenow E6,9, Vornhagen J9,10, Baldessari A11, Dighe MK8, Thiel J8, Merillat S9, Armistead B9,10, Tisoncik-Go J2,3, Green RR2,3, Davis MA2,3, Dewey EC2,3, Fairgrieve MR2,3, Gatenby JC8, Richards T8, Garden GA4,12, Diamond MS13,14,15,16, Juul SE6, Grant RF11, Kuller L11, Shaw DW8,17, Ogle J11, Gough GM11, Lee W11, English C11, Hevner RF18,19, Dobyns WB6,19, Gale M Jr2,3, Rajagopal L6,9,10.

Author information

  • 1Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington, USA.
  • 2Department of Immunology, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington, USA.
  • 3Center for Innate Immunity and Immune Disease, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington, USA.
  • 4Department of Pathology, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington, USA.
  • 5Department of Pathology, Seattle Children's Hospital, Seattle, Washington, USA.
  • 6Department of Pediatrics, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington, USA.
  • 7Department of Bioengineering, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington, USA.
  • 8Department of Radiology, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington, USA.
  • 9Center for Global Infectious Disease Research, Seattle Children's Research Institute, Seattle, Washington, USA.
  • 10Department of Global Health, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington, USA.
  • 11Washington National Primate Research Center, Seattle, Washington, USA.
  • 12Department of Neurology, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington, USA.
  • 13Department of Medicine, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, Missouri, USA.
  • 14Department of Molecular Microbiology, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, Missouri, USA.
  • 15Department of Pathology and Immunology, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, Missouri, USA.
  • 16Center for Human Immunology and Immunotherapy Programs, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, Missouri, USA.
  • 17Department of Radiology, Seattle Children's Hospital, Seattle, Washington, USA.
  • 18Department of Neurological Surgery, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington, USA.
  • 19Center for Integrative Brain Research, Seattle Children's Research Institute, Seattle, Washington, USA.

Abstract

We describe the development of fetal brain lesions after Zika virus (ZIKV) inoculation in a pregnant pigtail macaque. Periventricular lesions developed within 10 d and evolved asymmetrically in the occipital-parietal lobes. Fetal autopsy revealed ZIKV in the brain and significant cerebral white matter hypoplasia, periventricular white matter gliosis, and axonal and ependymal injury. Our observation of ZIKV-associated fetal brain lesions in a nonhuman primate provides a model for therapeutic evaluation.